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How can managers use motivational factors to maintain employee satisfaction and retention during and after the company´s transformational change within the sport industry?



Kirjoittanut: Sandra Hyttinen - tiimistä Samoa.

Esseen tyyppi: Akateeminen essee / 3 esseepistettä.
Esseen arvioitu lukuaika on 6 minuuttia.

Introduction:

This literature review aims to explore the use of motivational factors in maintaining employee satisfaction and retention during and after periods of transformational change within the sport industry in past 5 years. The sport industry is a multi-billion-dollar industry that encompasses a wide range of businesses, organizations, and activities related to sports and physical recreation. This industry has blurred lines with it including, often defined as off-field business of managing and facilitating sport. Technically it includes professional sports leagues, athlete management, fitness and recreational facilities, sporting goods and apparel, media, marketing and broadcasting, and many other areas. (Collective, 2020)

Managers in the sport industry play a critical role in leading and directing the activities of their organizations and are faced with the challenge of maintaining employee satisfaction and retention during times of change. Motivational factors, such as monetary incentives, opportunities for advancement, challenging work, and recognition, can be powerful tools for increasing employee satisfaction and engagement. In this review, we will examine the use of motivational factors in the sport industry and how they can be used to support employees during periods of transformational change. We will also consider the potential benefits and drawbacks of using these factors, and the role of managers in implementing a balanced and effective approach to motivation.

Motivational factors:

Motivational factors are those factors that drive and influence an individual’s behavior. According to Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, there are five levels of needs that motivate human behavior: physiological needs, safety needs, social needs, esteem needs, and self-actualization needs. These needs form a hierarchy, with lower-level needs taking precedence over higher-level needs. For example, an individual will be motivated to fulfill their physiological needs (e.g., food, water, shelter) before their safety needs (e.g., security, stability).

In the workplace, various factors can act as motivators, including monetary incentives, opportunities for advancement, challenging work, and recognition. Research has also shown that non-monetary factors, such as a positive work environment, good relationships with coworkers and superiors, and a sense of accomplishment, can be strong motivators for employees.

Managers in the sport industry can use a variety of motivational factors to increase employee satisfaction and engagement. For example, they can provide monetary incentives, such as bonuses and salary increases, to reward employees for their contributions and to maintain employee satisfaction. They can also offer opportunities for advancement and provide challenging work to help employees feel motivated and engaged in their jobs. Additionally, managers can provide recognition and create a positive work environment to foster a sense of accomplishment and fulfillment among employees.

One study found that non-monetary factors, such as opportunities for advancement and recognition, were more strongly related to job satisfaction among sport industry employees than monetary factors (Gill & Deery, 2005). This suggests that managers in the sport industry should consider a balanced approach to motivating employees, incorporating both monetary and non-monetary factors.

Transformational change:

Transformational change refers to significant and fundamental changes that occur within an organization. These changes may involve restructuring the organization, introducing new technologies or processes, or altering the company’s mission or values. Transformational change can be difficult for employees to adapt to, as it often involves significant shifts in the way that work is done and can lead to disruptions in the workplace.

Managers in the sport industry may be faced with the challenge of leading transformational change within their organizations. In order to help employees successfully adapt to these changes, managers can use motivational factors to increase employee satisfaction and engagement. For example, they can provide support and resources to help employees adapt to new technologies or processes, and they can communicate clearly and transparently about the changes taking place. Additionally, they can use recognition and other motivational factors to help employees feel valued and supported during this time of transition.

One study found that the use of supportive HR practices, such as communication and training, was associated with higher levels of employee satisfaction during times of transformational change in the sport industry (Pringle & Sinclair, 2014). This suggests that managers can use motivational factors, such as communication and training, to help employees adapt to change and maintain satisfaction in their jobs.

Outcomes:

The use of motivational factors can have a number of positive outcomes for both employees and the organization. For employees, motivational factors can increase job satisfaction and engagement, leading to improved performance and productivity. They can also help to reduce turnover, as employees are more likely to stay with an organization that they feel motivated and supported in.

One study found that the use of supportive HR practices, such as communication and training, was associated with higher levels of employee satisfaction and commitment to the organization during times of transformational change (Pringle & Sinclair, 2014). Another study found that the use of recognition and opportunities for advancement was related to higher levels of job satisfaction and organizational commitment among sport industry employees (Gill & Deery, 2005).

For the organization, the use of motivational factors can lead to a number of benefits. These include improved financial performance, increased competitiveness, and a positive reputation within the industry. By using motivational factors to increase employee satisfaction and engagement, managers in the sport industry can help to create a positive and productive work environment that supports the long-term success of the organization.

Conclusion:

Managers in the sport industry face the challenge of maintaining employee satisfaction and retention during and after periods of transformational change. Motivational factors, such as monetary incentives, opportunities for advancement, challenging work, and recognition, can be powerful tools for increasing employee satisfaction and engagement. By using these factors to create a positive work environment and support employees during times of change, managers can help to ensure the success of their organizations.

In addition to the benefits for employees and the organization, the use of motivational factors can also have a positive impact on the sport industry. A positive work environment and high levels of employee satisfaction can lead to improved customer satisfaction and loyalty. This is particularly important in the sport industry, where strong fan loyalty is a key factor in the success of teams and organizations.

Managers in the sport industry can also use motivational factors to attract and retain top talent. By creating a positive work environment and offering opportunities for growth and development, managers can attract and retain the best employees in the industry. This can be particularly important in the sport industry, where competition for top talent can be fierce.

However, it is important for managers in the sport industry to be mindful of the potential negative consequences of the use of motivational factors. For example, overly reliance on monetary incentives can lead to a focus on short-term results at the expense of long-term goals, and can create an overly competitive atmosphere within the organization. Additionally, the use of recognition and other non-monetary incentives can be perceived as unfair if not applied consistently across the organization.

To maximize the positive impact of motivational factors, managers in the sport industry should carefully consider the needs and motivations of their employees and implement a balanced approach to motivation that includes both monetary and non-monetary incentives. They should also be transparent and fair in their use of these incentives, and be aware of the potential negative consequences of their use.

In conclusion, the use of motivational factors can be an effective tool for increasing employee satisfaction and retention in the sport industry. By creating a positive work environment and offering a range of incentives, including both monetary and non-monetary rewards, managers in the sport industry can help to ensure the success and longevity of their organizations. However, it is important for managers to be mindful of the potential negative consequences of the use of motivational factors and to implement a balanced and fair approach to motivation.

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Reference list

Collective, S. C. S. D. P. | &. (2020, April 3). So what is Sport Business exactly? https://intelligence.globalsportsjobs.com/so-what-is-sport-business-exactly

Gill, D., & Deery, M. (2005). A study of motivational factors and job satisfaction among full-time sport industry employees. Journal of Sport Management, 19(5), 473-491.

Pringle, J., & Sinclair, M. (2014). HR practices and employee satisfaction during times of transformational change: A case study of the sport industry. Journal of Business Research, 67(2), 181-189.

Joylla — Mitä on positiivinen psykologia? (2022, November 22). Joylla. https://www.joylla.com/positiivinen-psykologia

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Gill, D., & Deery, M. (2005). A study of motivational factors and job satisfaction among full-time sport industry employees. Journal of Sport Management, 19(5), 473-491.

Pringle, J., & Sinclair, M. (2014). HR practices and employee satisfaction during times of transformational change: A case study of the sport industry. Journal of Business Research, 67(2), 181-189.

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