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The Importance of Ethical Leadership in Entrepreneurship and Organizational Culture



Kirjoittanut: Ruwanthi Moragoda Arachchi - tiimistä Ei tiimiä.

Esseen tyyppi: Akateeminen essee / 3 esseepistettä.

KIRJALÄHTEET
KIRJA KIRJAILIJA
Journal of business venturing,
Journal of applied psychology, 93
The leadership quarterly
R.A. Baron, J.Tang,
C.N Brown
S.A Eisenbeiss
Van Knippenberg
M. Kuenzi
R.L Greenbaum
H.K. Kwan
Esseen arvioitu lukuaika on 11 minuuttia.

 

Introduction

Ethical leadership has gained increasing attention in recent years, particularly in the context of entrepreneurship and organizational culture. Ethical leadership is a leadership style which emphasizes ethical principles and values, such as honesty, integrity, accountability, and social responsibility. Ethical leaders are committed to creating a culture of ethics and values in their organizations, and they encourage ethical behavior and decision-making among their groups (Brown, 2005).

The importance of ethical leadership in entrepreneurship and organizational culture cannot be overstated. Entrepreneurship is a dynamic and challenging process that requires creativity, innovation, and risk-taking (Baron,2011). In this context, ethical leadership is essential to ensuring that entrepreneurs and their organizations operate in a socially responsible and sustainable manner (Baum, 2001). Ethical leaders can help startups and small businesses to establish a culture of ethics and values from the beginning, which can have long-term benefits for their success and reputation (Resick,2006). Similarly, in established organizations, ethical leadership can promote a culture of trust, respect, and accountability, which can enhance employee commitment and organizational performance (Den,2012).

In this essay, we will explore the significance of ethical leadership in entrepreneurship and organizational culture. Specifically, we will examine the role of ethical leadership in promoting ethical behavior, building trust and commitment, and enhancing decision-making in organizations. We will also discuss the challenges that leaders may face in promoting ethical leadership in their organizations, and strategies for overcoming these challenges.

Ethical Leadership and Entrepreneurship

Entrepreneurship is a complex and dynamic process that involves identifying new opportunities, creating innovative products or services, and taking risks (Baron, 2011). In this context, ethical leadership plays a critical role in ensuring that entrepreneurs and their organizations operate in a socially responsible and sustainable manner (Baum, 2001). Ethical leaders in entrepreneurship are committed to creating a culture of ethics and values in their organizations, and they encourage ethical behavior and decision-making among their groups (Brown, 2005).

The importance of ethical leadership in entrepreneurship can be seen in several ways. First, ethical leadership can help entrepreneurs to establish a reputation for integrity and trustworthiness, which can enhance their credibility with stakeholders, including customers, investors, and regulators (Den, 2012). This, in turn, can lead to greater support and loyalty from these stakeholders, and improve the chances of long-term success for the organization (Baum, 2001).

Second, ethical leadership can promote a culture of ethical behavior and decision-making in startups and small businesses, which can have long-term benefits for their success and sustainability. Research has exposed that ethical leaders are more likely to create a culture of trust, respect, and accountability in their organizations, which can enhance employee commitment and job satisfaction (Mayer, 2010). Improved job satisfaction can result in decreased turnover rates, increased productivity, and enhanced performance outcomes. (Den, 2012; Resick, 2006).

Third, ethical leadership can help entrepreneurs to navigate ethical dilemmas and challenges that arise in their business operations. Startups and small businesses often face unique ethical challenges, such as pressure to cut corners, lack of resources, and conflicts of interest (Brown et al., 2005). Ethical leaders can provide guidance and support to their followers in these situations, and assist them in making ethical choices that are consistent with the values and principles of the organization.

In order to be effective, ethical leadership in entrepreneurship requires certain characteristics and behaviors on the part of the leader. Some of these characteristics include honesty, integrity, fairness, and transparency (Resick, 2006). Ethical leaders in entrepreneurship also demonstrate a commitment to social responsibility, and are willing to take responsibility for the social and environmental impacts of their organizations (Treviño, 2003).

Successful examples can be found in various industries and contexts. For instance, Patagonia, an outdoor clothing company headquartered in California, has gained recognition for its dedication to ethical business practices and sustainability. (Brown, 2022). The company’s founder is known for his advocacy of environmental causes, and his efforts to promote fair labor practices in the company’s supply chain. Patagonia has instituted several initiatives aimed at decreasing its environmental impact and fostering social responsibility, such as the “Worn Wear” program, motivating customers to mend and recycle their clothes, rather than acquiring new items.

Another example of ethical leadership in entrepreneurship is the case of Warby Parker, an eyewear enterprise that has disrupted the conventional eyewear industry by providing trendy and affordable glasses through online channels (Webdeveloper). Warby Parker’s founders have emphasized the importance of social responsibility and ethical business practices from the beginning, and have implemented various initiatives to promote these values.

Ethical Leadership and Organizational Culture

The organizational culture of a company is significantly influenced by the ethical leadership demonstrated by its leaders. Organizational culture pertains to the collective values, beliefs, actions, and customs that define an organization and its members. A positive and ethical organizational culture can have numerous benefits, such as improved employee morale, greater customer satisfaction, and increased innovation (Denison, 1995).

Ethical leaders in organizations are responsible for creating a culture of ethics and values, where ethical behavior is valued and encouraged, and unethical behavior is not tolerated (Treviño, 2003). Ethical leaders also endorse a culture of trust, transparency, and accountability, where employees feel comfortable reporting unethical behavior and are confident that ethical issues will be addressed appropriately (Mayer, 2010).

One way in which ethical leaders can shape the organizational culture of a company is by modeling ethical behavior themselves. Leaders who consistently demonstrate ethical behavior, such as honesty, fairness, and respect, are more likely to inspire these values in their employees (Brown, 2005). This can create a ripple effect throughout the organization, where employees want to follow the leader’s example and exhibit ethical behavior themselves.

Ethical leaders can also shape the organizational culture by establishing clear ethical standards and expectations for their employees. This can include developing a code of ethics or conduct, providing ethics training and education, and incorporating ethical considerations into performance evaluations (Den, 2012). Through the establishment of these standards and expectations, leaders can guarantee that employees are cognizant of what is required of them and are responsible for upholding ethical conduct.

Another way in which ethical leaders can shape the organizational culture is by promoting open communication and transparency. Ethical leaders encourage employees to speak up about ethical concerns or violations, and create channels for employees to report such issues without fear of retaliation (Treviño, 2003). This promotes a culture of trust and transparency, where employees feel at ease voicing their concerns and are confident that their apprehensions will be handled suitably.

Finally, ethical leaders can shape the organizational culture by promoting a commitment to social responsibility and sustainability. Leaders who prioritize these values are more likely to inspire their employees to do the same, and to create a culture where social responsibility is valued and practiced (Baum, 2001). This can have numerous benefits, such as improved reputation and stakeholder support, as well as greater employee engagement and job satisfaction (Den, 2012).

Successful examples of ethical leadership and organizational culture can be found in various companies and industries. For instance, the outdoor retailer REI has been recognized for its commitment to sustainability and ethical business practices (Rei, 2022). The company has established clear ethical standards and expectations for its employees, and provides training and resources to help them make ethical decisions. REI also cultivates a culture of transparency and responsibility, wherein employees are urged to express ethical concerns and issues.

Trust and Commitment in Ethical Leadership

Trust is a crucial element of ethical leadership, as it is required for leaders to build and maintain strong relationships with their employees and stakeholders (Dirks, 2002). Ethical leaders who demonstrate integrity, honesty, and transparency are more likely to inspire trust among their followers (Mayer, 2010). Trust in turn can lead to greater commitment and engagement among employees, as they feel a sense of loyalty and obligation to their leader and organization (Dirks, 2002).

An effective approach for ethical leaders to establish trust and dedication is by developing a shared purpose and vision. Leaders who can express a distinct and compelling vision for their organization, and align it with the values and aspirations of their employees, are more likely to inspire commitment and dedication. This can create a sense of shared ownership and responsibility, where employees feel invested in the success of the organization and are more likely to go above and beyond their job duties.

Ethical leaders can also build trust and commitment by demonstrating humility and vulnerability. Leaders who are willing to admit their mistakes and shortcomings, and to learn from their failures, are more likely to earn the respect and loyalty of their employees (Gardner, 2005). This approach can instill a culture of candor and integrity, where employees feel at ease exchanging their own experiences and perspectives, and where mistakes are viewed as opportunities for growth and improvement.

Another way in which ethical leaders can build trust and commitment is by empowering their employees and promoting a sense of autonomy and ownership. Leaders who delegate responsibility and decision-making authority to their employees, and who provide opportunities for growth and development, are more likely to instill a sense of ownership and involvement among their followers. This can result in improved job satisfaction, motivation, increased innovation and creativity.

Finally, ethical leaders can build trust and commitment by prioritizing the well-being and development of their employees. Leaders who provide support and resources for their employees’ physical, emotional, and professional needs are more likely to inspire loyalty and commitment (Eisenbeiss,2008). This can include offering flexible work arrangements, providing opportunities for training and development, and promoting work-life balance. By making the well-being of their employees a top priority, leaders can create a culture of caring and support, where employees feel valued and appreciated.

Ethical Decision-making in Ethical Leadership

Ethical leadership involves not only behaving ethically oneself, but also promoting ethical behavior among others (Brown, 2005). One key aspect of ethical leadership is the ability to make ethical decisions, even in difficult or ambiguous situations. Ethical decision-making involves considering not only the legal and financial implications of a decision, but also its moral and social consequences (Treviño, 2003). Ethical leaders must be able to balance competing interests and values, and make decisions that are consistent with their organization’s values and mission.

One approach to ethical decision-making is the ethical decision-making framework proposed by (Treviño,2003).This framework involves several steps, including identifying the ethical issue, gathering relevant information, considering the relevant ethical standards, identifying the stakeholders and their interests, considering the available options, and choosing the course of action that is consistent with ethical principles and values. This framework can help leaders to make thoughtful and systematic decisions, and to consider the potential impacts of their decisions on all stakeholders.

Another approach to ethical decision-making is the virtue ethics approach. Ethical leaders who embody these virtues are more likely to make decisions that align with their values and beliefs, and to inspire others to behave ethically as well.

In addition to these approaches, ethical leaders can also use various tools and techniques to promote ethical decision-making in their organizations. For example, leaders can establish codes of conduct and ethical guidelines that outline the organization’s values and expectations for behavior (Treviño, 2003). Leaders can also provide training and education on ethical decision-making, and create opportunities for employees to discuss and reflect on ethical issues (Brown, 2005). By promoting a culture of ethical decision-making, leaders can help to ensure that ethical considerations are integrated into all aspects of their organization’s operations.

However, ethical decision-making is not always easy, and ethical leaders may face numerous challenges and obstacles in their efforts to promote ethical behavior. For example, leaders may face pressure from stakeholders to prioritize financial performance over ethical considerations (Sims, 2003). Leaders may also face conflicts between their personal values and the values of their organization, or may be uncertain about how to apply ethical principles in complex or ambiguous situations (Treviño,2003). Ethical leaders must be prepared to navigate these challenges and to make difficult decisions in the face of uncertainty and ambiguity.

One example of a company that prioritizes ethical decision-making in ethical leadership is Ben & Jerry’s, an ice cream enterprise recognized for its dedication to social justice and environmental sustainability (Lim,2021). The company’s founders, Ben Cohen and Jerry Greenfield, have been outspoken advocates for ethical business practices and have established a culture of social and environmental responsibility within the company. Ben & Jerry’s has developed a comprehensive social mission that guides all aspects of its operations, including sourcing ingredients from Fairtrade-certified suppliers, reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and promoting social justice initiatives. By prioritizing ethical decision-making, Ben & Jerry’s has built a reputation as a socially responsible company and has attracted a loyal and committed customer base.

Challenges to Ethical Leadership

Despite the benefits of ethical leadership, there are numerous challenges that leaders may face in their efforts to promote ethical behavior. Some of the key challenges to ethical leadership include conflicting values and interests, pressures from stakeholders, and individual differences in ethical decision-making.

One major challenge to ethical leadership is conflicting values and interests. Organizations are composed of diverse stakeholders, each with their own values and interests, and these may sometimes conflict with the organization’s ethical principles and values. For example, a leader may face pressure from shareholders to prioritize financial performance over social responsibility, or may need to balance the needs of customers, employees, and other stakeholders in making decisions. Ethical leaders must be able to navigate these conflicting values and interests and find solutions that are consistent with their organization’s values and mission.

Another challenge to ethical leadership is pressures from stakeholders. Leaders may face pressure from external stakeholders, such as customers, suppliers, and regulatory agencies, as well as internal stakeholders, such as employees and managers (Sims,2003). These pressures may sometimes conflict with ethical principles and values, and may make it difficult for leaders to promote ethical behavior. For example, a leader may face pressure to meet unrealistic sales targets, which could lead to unethical behavior such as misleading advertising or aggressive sales tactics.

Individual differences in ethical decision-making can also pose a challenge to ethical leadership. Different individuals may have different values, beliefs, and ethical standards, and may therefore approach ethical decision-making differently. Some individuals may be more willing to take risks or prioritize financial performance over ethical considerations, while others may be more risk-averse or prioritize social responsibility. Ethical leaders must be able to understand and navigate these individual differences in order to promote ethical behavior and decision-making within their organizations.

Another challenge to ethical leadership is the potential for ethical lapses or misconduct within an organization. Even with the best intentions and efforts, ethical leaders may sometimes fail to prevent unethical behavior or may themselves engage in unethical conduct (Treviño, 2003). In such cases, it is important for ethical leaders to take responsibility for their actions, to learn from their mistakes, and to take steps to prevent future ethical lapses.

Despite these challenges, ethical leadership is essential for promoting ethical behavior and building a culture of integrity within organizations. By modeling ethical behavior, promoting a culture of ethical decision-making, and navigating the challenges and obstacles to ethical leadership, leaders can aid in cultivating trust and commitment among employees, customers, and other stakeholders.

Conclusion

Ethical leadership plays a crucial role in promoting ethical behavior and creating a culture of integrity within organizations. Ethical leaders can model ethical behavior, promote a culture of ethical decision-making, build trust and commitment among stakeholders, and navigate the challenges and obstacles to ethical leadership. By doing so, they can create sustainable, ethical, and successful organizations that benefit all stakeholders.

However, ethical leadership is not without its challenges. Conflicting values and interests, pressures from stakeholders, individual differences in ethical decision-making, and the potential for ethical lapses or misconduct all pose challenges to ethical leadership. These challenges require leaders to be aware of the ethical implications of their decisions, to take responsibility for their actions, and to learn from their mistakes.

Despite these challenges, ethical leadership is essential for creating a culture of integrity and responsibility within organizations. By promoting ethical behavior and decision-making, leaders can create a workplace that is more fulfilling and engaging for employees, more trustworthy and transparent for customers, and more sustainable and successful in the long term.

References

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Baum, J.R., Locke, E.A. and Smith, K.G., 2001. A multidimensional model of venture growth. Academy of management journal44(2), pp.292-303.

Brown, C.N., 2022. FASHION BRAND SUSTAINBILITY COMMUNICATION: MARKETING STRATEGIES (Doctoral dissertation, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona).

Brown, M.E., Treviño, L.K. and Harrison, D.A., 2005. Ethical leadership: A social learning perspective for construct development and testing. Organizational behavior and human decision processes97(2), pp.117-134.

Den Hartog, D.N. and Belschak, F.D., 2012. Work engagement and Machiavellianism in the ethical leadership process. Journal of business ethics107, pp.35-47.

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Dirks, K.T. and Ferrin, D.L., 2002. Trust in leadership: meta-analytic findings and implications for research and practice. Journal of applied psychology87(4), p.611.

Eisenbeiss, S.A., Van Knippenberg, D. and Boerner, S., 2008. Transformational leadership and team innovation: integrating team climate principles. Journal of applied psychology93(6), p.1438.

Gardner, W.L., Avolio, B.J., Luthans, F., May, D.R. and Walumbwa, F., 2005. “Can you see the real me?” A self-based model of authentic leader and follower development. The leadership quarterly16(3), pp.343-372.

Lim, J.S. and Young, C., 2021. Effects of issue ownership, perceived fit, and authenticity in corporate social advocacy on corporate reputation. Public Relations Review47(4), p.102071.

Mayer, D.M., Kuenzi, M. and Greenbaum, R.L., 2010. Examining the link between ethical leadership and employee misconduct: The mediating role of ethical climate. Journal of business ethics95, pp.7-16.

Rei (2022) Rei co-op reports strong growth in 2021, setting co-op record in membership, REI. REI. Available at: https://www.rei.com/newsroom/article/rei-co-op-reports-strong-growth-in-2021-setting-co-op-record-in-membership (Accessed: March 25, 2023).

Resick, C.J., Martin, G.S., Keating, M.A., Dickson, M.W., Kwan, H.K. and Peng, C., 2011. What ethical leadership means to me: Asian, American, and European perspectives. Journal of business ethics101, pp.435-457.

Sims, R.R. and Brinkmann, J., 2003. Business ethics curriculum design: Suggestions and illustrations. Teaching Business Ethics7, pp.69-86.

Treviño, L.K., Brown, M. and Hartman, L.P., 2003. A qualitative investigation of perceived executive ethical leadership: Perceptions from inside and outside the executive suite. Human relations56(1), pp.5-37.

Webdeveloper (no date) Warby Parker: Too good to sustain?, Warby Parker: Too Good to Sustain?|Leadership and Entrepreneurship|Case Study|Case Studies. Available at: https://www.icmrindia.org/casestudies/catalogue/Leadership%20and%20Entrepreneurship/Warby%20Parker-Case.htm (Accessed: March 25, 2023).

 

I'm Ruwanthi from Sri Lanka. Now I'm living in Tampere.

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